Endings


Endgames in general usually deal with either queening a pawn, or mating the enemy king by
trapping him into the edge or corner of the board.

Queen + King vs. King


This one is pretty simple. Make sure you do not move your queen somewhere the enemy king can
grab it by a well-timed move. The key to winning is to systematically push the enemy king
farther and farther back, until he has nowhere left to go. In the following diagram, note that
the enemy king is trapped in the upper half of the board. Do not give him any free space, but
trap him further and further up the board. In the following diagram: white plays Qd4.
This forces black to move back 1 rank. Continue pushing him back in this fashion, always
defending your queen with your king, until he is pushed all the way back.



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Rook + King vs. King


This one is much more tricky, and is not technically possible to win, due to the
fact that one is never obliged to move in kungfuchess unless you are under direct threat. However, with some "tricks"
you can give your opponent a very hard time, and you have about a 98 percent chance of winning if you time it right.
As with mating with a queen, you must try to box the enemy in the smallest part of the board
as possible, and then push him back until he is all the way to the edge.



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White must first stare face to face with the enemy king - in chess
terms this is called 'having the opposition'. Once you are face-to-face with the enemy king,
bring your rook to attack him, and then inch it closer square by square until you are at
the following position:



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This is the basic position in which several possibilities can happen - knowledge of these possibilities gives you
the advantage as either black or white.

#1 White tries to take black's king: This will result in black either moving back a rank, or to the right. If black
moves back a rank, this is good for white, since he has been forced 1 row further bank, and white can now move his
king up to block black from moving back to the rank he was at. If black continues doing this - he will eventually
be pushed all the way against the last rank, and then will have to dodge to the right or left of the rook.
However, Black does not need to move backwards. That is a weak move. Better is if he moves to the side: then
then you get the following position, and it is apparent that white has not made any progress at all.



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Black has moved to the right, and of course, will be able to move again before white's rook recovers. Therefore
white is forced to Move up and left to defend his rook, and that means that instead of pushing black further back
against the wall, black has merely been given more freedom.

#2: White does the fake: In this situation, white guesses that black will try to dodge when he sees the rook coming
towards him, so he therefore moves the rook just 1 square closer to black, "faking" him out that he is going to try to
actually take. If black then moves to the right, white has boxed him further into the corner, and if black moves
back, of course, he has been boxed further into the wall. Lastly, black can anticipate this move - and not move his
king at all - then actually take white's rook. That will result in a draw. Keep in mind however, that it is extremely
nerve- racking for black to make this decision, especially if white is mixing in actual take attempts with his fakes.
Therefore, for black to adopt the strategy of not moving, is extremely risky. It is kind of a rock papers scissors
type game, in which white calls the shots.

I had thought that the above 2 attempts by white were his best chance of winning - but then, after I later realized
the tactic of attacking a square and simultaneously moving your king up into danger (hoping that the enemy will
withdraw from that square, to the right perhaps, which you can then TAKE with your king. So therefore, the last
maneuever, which REALLY makes black's task difficult: is

#3: Attempt to take - and also move the king up into danger. Shown in the following diagram, this attempt actually
gives you a chance of losing. However, against an unprepared opponent, it can virtually guarantee you a win.



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Note that all 3 pieces are recharging their meters. If white happened to have moved before black did, he wins
If white ended up moving AFTER black did, and that is a very valid risk, he LOSES! Therefore be careful about
timing. First, find out how quickly black will move away when you try to take or fake him with the rook.
Then, when you know how fast he generally moves away, move your king BEFORE this.
If you are defending as black in this position - Do not allow white to do this. When you see white's rook
moving towards you, IMMEDIATELY move to the right. This way, if white is planning on moving his king up into
danger like that - you will actually win! However, if white mixes all 3 plans, unpredictably, white will either
get a win, or push black all the way back to the end of the board, until he has no more squares to dodge to. Black
can draw, if his timing is perfect, (probably impossible, unless you are a computer), or win if white takes the risk.

King + 2 pawns vs. King


In this situation you can win most of the time. If the 2 pawns are connected, push 1 of
them forwards. If the enemy king tries to take the pawn that is behind, you simply push
the advanced one to queen. If the enemy king does not do so, you simply move your king up
and help your pawns queen.

The following diagram shows 2 unconnected pawns vs. a king.
In this situation, put the pawns side by side to each other. The second black attacks one
of the pawns, Push the other one! Black will then be forced to back up in order to prevent
it from queening. To win this scenario you must advance your king to help one of the pawns
queen.



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King and pawn vs. King


The endgame of 1 pawn + king vs. king is quite simple. If the side without a pawn can get IN FRONT of the pawn,
it is a draw (There is no way to move the enemy king from the blockade of the pawn). If the enemy king cannot get
in front of the pawn, it is a win for the side with the pawn, except in the following situation, when the pawn is
on the side of the board (Generally pawns on the side of the board, called 'rook pawns' are the worst to have
in an endgame. In the following position - Black merely stays level with white's king (called "Keeping the opposition")
and white's king can never escape from the rook file. Note that unfortunately, due to the nature of move races, it is
possible that white could 'outrace' black by continually moving up and down and trying to win the move. When
move-queuing becomes a feature, this will not be an issue. (It is only possible if white can gain time on black
after every move, and if black already has a move ready, it would take literally hundreds of up and down moves,
therefore still being a draw, unless white is much better at moving quickly.)



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