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the intuitive sacrifice
advanced intuitive sacrifice

Hey kids, it’s Uncle Rogue here with some elite strategy advice for you all. 
You wanna be as cool and amazing at KFC as me? Of course you do. So listen up and you might learn something.

Today’s topic is 

THE INTUITIVE SACRIFICE.

Most people only consider calculative sacrifices – that is to say, sacrifices that can be seen to give an immediate yield. However, there is another type of sacrifice, called an intuitive sacrifice. This sacrifice does not yield any immediate benefit, but helps to establish a strong overall position in compensation for the material given up. This sacrifice often involves exchanging a piece for pawns, since pawns in KFC are extraordinarily strong in comparison to their regular chess counterparts. Let this be illustrated with an example played hundreds of times by myself in real games. In the following position, Rogue Dragon has the black pieces, and is in a seemingly perilous position after white has opened extremely rapidly. Board position: White: a2, b3, c4, d3, e4, f4, g4, h3, Nc3, Ne2, Be3, Bg2, Re1, Rg1, Qd2, Kf2. Black: a7, b6, c6, d6, e7, f5, g6, h7, Nd7, Nf6, Be6, Bg7, Rf8, Rg8, Qc7, Kf7.
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White, having the advantage of a fast cable connection over Rogue’s pathetic 56k modem, was able to move 
much faster and thus has the initiative to dictate proceedings. Thus he is able to capture the pawn on f5, 
using either the e or the g pawns. However, Rogue has a counter prepared for such a move.

Let us assume firstly, that our opponent takes the pawn with his e-pawn.

1. exf5, Ng3, Ne2

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How should Rogue respond?

1…gxf5, Nxg4, h5, Ndf6
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Now if white resumes by capturing the knight, black can retake with his f-pawn and stabilise the position 
with Bf5 and e6, as well as bringing up his rooks to h8 and g8 in order to support the pawns at 
a later stage. Black now has two passed pawns on the queenside, while white’s pawn on f4 is decisively weak. 
This could perhaps be enough to win the game as things unfold.

But what if white takes with the g-pawn?

1. gxf5, Ng3, Ne2.
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Black can simply respond with another intuitive sacrifice:

1….Nxe4, Nf6, gxf5, d5.

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Now if white captures the knight and pawn using his pawns, black can simply recapture with his pawns,
and play Bf5 and e6 in support.

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This leaves black with an extraordinarily strong centre, which has in many games proved decisive.

Therefore, perhaps the best move white has at his disposal was g5, 
which secures his spatial advantage rather than greedily trying to grab material.



ADVANCED INTUITIVE SACRIFICE

Now let us look at an example from a more advanced game between two of the best players in the game. In the following scenario, Tictacsforpresident has the White pieces and RogueDragon has Black. Board position: White: a2, b3, c2, d4, e3, f2, g3, h4, Nc3, Ne2, Bb2, Bg2, Rh1, Qd3, 0-0-0 Black: a7, b6, c6, d6, e7, f5, g6, h7, Nd7, Nf6, Be6, Bg7, Rf8, Rg8, Qc7, Kf7.
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White, an excellent positional player, has a superb position with the option to create 
a knight outpost on f4 and his bishops are bearing down on the centre of the board. 
However, fear not! Your hero Rogue is an excellent counter-attacking player and has faced such 
scenarios many times before.

If Black sits and tries to defend in this position, he will probably lose. White has 
a fantastic positional advantage and can bring the game under his control if Black doesn’t 
reclaim some space rapidly. Thus, Rogue plays a sacrifice for positional advantage.

1….Ne4!, d5, b5, a6, Nf6, g5, h6

Rogue knows that Tictacs will almost certainly play f3 as the first Knight moves. This is not an error, 
but a calculated sacrifice.
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Suppose Tictacs accepts the sacrifice with 2. fxe4, and Rogue recaptures with fxe4.
Let us analyse the resulting position:

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White’s position:

- White is effectively a pawn up. However, ssee below.

- White no longer has any real game plan to  develop. His position was based on strong positional play, 
which has now been made redundant by a restriction of space.

- White now lacks outposts for his pieces. TThe light squared bishop is effectively useless because 
it cannot move to f3, and h3 is also unfeasible in view of Rh8, followed by Bxh3 and either g4, 
or hxg5, hxg5 where the rook supports the Bishop, and Black can double Rooks down the h-file
threatening to win the Bishop outright.

Nf4 with hxg5 is the only real outpost for white, but after hxg5 the Knight must retreat again. 
Black can then play g4 unless white does so, putting the pawn in great peril.

- White has inferior space in the centre, meeaning the movement of his pieces is highly restricted.

- White’s main area of material advantage liies on the queenside, which he must open up if he is 
to maintain any sort of challenge for the game.

Black’s Position:

- Black is effectively a pawn down. However,, see below.

- Black has more space in the centre, restriicting White’s piece movement.

- Black has ample space for all his pieces eexcept perhaps the dark squared Bishop. 
However, Black can also sacrifice this later in the game with Bxd4 and c5/e5, further improving 
his already commanding centre. This bishop could also be used to support a pawn advance to e5.

- Black has a potentially powerful outpost oon f3, which can be used later in the game to post 
a rook or knight. This would be made even stronger with the advance of g4.

- Black can also open the g-file at will forr his other rook, unless white plays hxg5 which 
only serves to open the h-file

- If white should advance his kingside pawnss, Black has a good threat via Kg7 and Bf7, followed 
by doubling rooks on the f-file. The following position could then be reached:
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This doesn’t look good for White. Black could also sacrifice again 
with the dark squared bishop on d4, in hope of overwhelming White’s crumbling defences.

So basically, this sacrifice is great for Black. Despite being a pawn down, Black has 
gained the initiative and has great potential to at least win his pawn back, if not totally 
dominate the board. Thus in the actual game Tictacs declined the sacrifice in view of this; 
yet ultimately he succumbed to Rogue’s might nevertheless because of the space 
Rogue had gained by playing Ne4.